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Safety Alert: If you believe your computer activities are being monitored, please access this site from a safer computer. To immediately exit this site, click the escape button. If you are in immediate danger, contact 911, a local crisis line, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224.


Written by: Jose Juan Lara, Jr., Project Manager, Casa de Esperanza: National Latin@ Network Barriers to Full Inclusion of Latin@ Communities in Emergency Planning[1] As previously mentioned, Latinos are the nation’s largest and fastest-growing racial/ethnic group and an important population in many cities and states. For example, at the time of Katrina, the 117 hardest-hit […]

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By: Cassie Amundson-Muñoz, Community Engagement Communications Specialist, Casa de Esperanza With sunlight flooding into the collaborative work areas of the new administrative office for Casa de Esperanza in St. Paul, Minnesota, women who participate in the Fuerza Unida Amig@s initiative put the finishing touches on the altar they created for Día de los Muertos. On […]

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On October 25, 2018, Dr. Julia Perilla, co-founder of Caminar Latino in Atlanta, Georgia, and the first director of Casa de Esperanza’s National Latin@ Research Center on Family and Social Change, passed away. Before her retirement in 2016, Julia was a clinical community psychologist and faculty member in the Psychology Department at Georgia State University […]

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Written by: Jose Juan Lara, Jr., Project Manager, Casa de Esperanza: National Latin@ Network Disasters, whether manmade or natural, affect entire communities regardless of an individual’s  age, immigration status, ability, faith practices, racial and/or ethnic identity, or gender identity. Current research on emergency preparedness systems consistently demonstrate minority communities are more vulnerable than others across […]

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Written by: Felix R. Martinez-Paz, Men and Boys Engagement Coordinator, Casa de Esperanza When I share my story, as a Latino man, I would like to remind everyone that it is the result of my experiences and what I have learned over the years. It doesn’t necessarily reflect everyone’s experience and should not be used […]

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The University of Southern California Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work published a research article examining the mental health effects that the threat of deportation poses to those who experience it. Casa de Esperanza’s National Latin@ Network has published it in three parts. Click here to read Part 1, click here to read part 2, or […]

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Domestic Violence Awareness Month (DVAM) evolved from the “Day of Unity” held in October 1981 and conceived by the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence. The intent was to connect advocates across the nation who were working to end violence against women and their children. The Day of Unity soon became an entire week devoted to […]

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Written by: María Cristina Pacheco-Alcalá, Project Manager, Casa de Esperanza: National Latin@ Network In 2008, Congress approved a measure designating September as National Campus Safety Awareness Month to encourage a public conversation on important topics about violence prevention in colleges and universities. When we think about safety, many things come to mind, but safety, by […]

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This blog was written by María Cristina Pacheco Alcalá, a Puerto Rican who lives on the island and works as Project Manager for the National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families and Communities, a project of Casa de Esperanza. Today, Thursday, September 20, 2018, marks the one-year anniversary of the day that Hurricane Maria passed through […]

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Access this information and more resources about LEP access by accessing our toolkit here. Systems change is a process that involves responding to an instance of lack of language access (for example) and builds on that one experience to create significant change in a system or service. The following steps were outlined through an interview […]

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