Español |English
Escape

Safety Alert: If you believe your computer activities are being monitored, please access this site from a safer computer. To immediately exit this site, click the escape button. If you are in immediate danger, contact 911, a local crisis line, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224.

Skip Navigation

Safety Alert: If you believe your computer activities are being monitored, please access this site from a safer computer. To immediately exit this site, click the escape button. If you are in immediate danger, contact 911, a local crisis line, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224.


Advancing Scholarship and Community-based Solutions for Latino Boys and Men

Thursday, September 21st, 2017

RISE for Latino boys and menDeveloping culturally relevant human services for racial and ethnic minorities has become a national priority. However, understanding what works, how it works, and why it works within certain cultural-specific communities continues to be severely limited, despite efforts of professional fields to promote multicultural practice. This limitation is only intensified when looking at the subpopulation of boys and men within communities of color. One way to fill this gap is to utilize a culturally specific framework to guide the scan of various sources of knowledge such as academic literature and community-led products.

Researchers Silvia Mazzula, PhD., of John Jay College and Josie Serrata, PhD., of Casa de Esperanza’s National Latin@ Network published a study for RISE for Boys and Men of Color to  address systemic limitations on understanding the state of the field by utilizing an interdisciplinary and comprehensive approach to identify community-based solutions with Latino and African American men and boys that may not be included in the academic literature base. Specifically, they engaged the community-centered evidence-based practice approach, which required moving beyond understandings of academic findings to include practice-based knowledge from multiple data sources. This approach was developed in direct response to the lack of culturally relevant academic literature and practices that reflect the complexity of ethnic and racial minority communities.

The authors address systemic limitations on understanding the state of the field and review mainstream academic knowledge, as well as knowledge from community-based initiatives with Latino boys and men in the area of healthy masculinity.

Some Project Recommendations:

  • Increase research, evaluation, and academic publications that prioritize approaches that center voices of participants, that is, of Latino men and boys, as well as GBTQ Latinos, to identify promising approaches and their challenges and opportunities.
  • Future research and academic publications should define the terms “Latino” or “Hispanic” when discussing people of Latinx origin in general, and Latino boys and men specifically, as well as any other racial cultural term.
  • Increase number of academic publications, research studies, and evaluation efforts that attend to within group differences (e.g., ethnic background, generation status, immigration status, etc.).
  • Increase research efforts that highlight the use of subgroup analysis technique to capture intersectional identities. For example, when publishing research studies, move away from reporting participant’s racial-cultural characteristics in simple general terms such as “Latino”/“Hispanic.” Researchers and scholars should provide at a minimum at least one other racial-cultural identifier (e.g., language, generation status, nativity, etc.).
  • Increase number of academic publications, research, and evaluation efforts that incorporate the psychological understanding of participants’ racial cultural identities (e.g., racial identity, ethnic identity, acculturation level, etc.).

Click here to access the study and read the rest of the researchers’ recommendations, findings, and discussion. For questions, email Josie Serrata at jserrata@casadeesperanza.org.

Te Invito is a toolkit developed by Casa de Esperanza: National Latino Network as a collection of resources and materials for individuals and organizations to increase awareness and engage Latino men and boys in preventing domestic violence. It contains information about programs that have been documented to work effectively, key cultural considerations, a customizable PSA campaign that organizations can use in their local area, and suggestions for how individuals can become more involved in working to end domestic violence. For more information, visit teinvito.org.

Comment Feed

No Responses (yet)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available