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Safety Alert: If you believe your computer activities are being monitored, please access this site from a safer computer. To immediately exit this site, click the escape button. If you are in immediate danger, contact 911, a local crisis line, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224.


Category Archives: Accessibility

Post submitted by Marissa Young, Outreach and Training Coordinator at the Asian/Pacific Islander Domestic Resource Project (DVRP). Culturally accessible services allow survivors to feel understood, cared for and heard. Providing culturally accessible services requires more than just employing staff who speak the same language as the survivors. It also means ensuring that survivors are understood […]

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For the entire LEP In Courts Toolkit, click here. It IS the obligation of any organization, agency, or court system that receives federal funds to provide meaningful language access for individuals with limited English proficiency at no cost to the individual. It does not matter what type of court hearing (civil, criminal, or administrative matters), what step of […]

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Systems change is a process that involves responding to an instance of lack of language access (for example) and builds on that one experience to create significant change in a system or service. The following steps were outlined through an interview with Enlace Comunitario, a social justice organization led by Latina women located in Albuquerque, […]

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On June 15th, the National Latin@ Network will observe World Elder Abuse Awareness Day. Like all adult survivors of abuse, older adults have a complex set of circumstances shaped by culture, gender, sexual orientation, and immigration status.  Latin@ older survivors may face additional barriers that require service providers to examine how they are currently delivering […]

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U.S. Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women 2016 STOP Administrators & Coalition Directors Joint Meeting Remarks by Z. Ruby White Starr, March 29, 2016 I joined Casa de Esperanza as their Chief Strategy Officer in July of last year after working at various mainstream organizations. Since then I’ve had some time to reflect […]

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Within the last two years, sexual assault on college campuses has made the national spotlight. Currently, the Office for Civil Rights in the Department of Education is investigating 208 cases of civil rights violations from the handling of sexual assault reports at 167 colleges. That number is likely to rise, as college students and parents become more knowledgeable of their rights and begin to unearth the troubling ways in which college administrators deal with reports of sexual assault.

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By: Molly Davies, MSW, ACSW Services for elder abuse survivors are akin to an unfinished haphazardly executed quilt.  Some squares made of fine silk, others threadbare cotton, and still so many others with squares missing completely. Services are unique to each community and vary greatly even within a single county. When I think about services for survivors […]

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We are pleased to announce the release of a new toolkit for the field! “Making Sexual and Domestic Violence Services Accessible to Individuals with Limited English Proficiency: A Planning Tool for Advocacy Organizations” bridges the gap between the laws, rules, and standards of services; and the effort necessary – community assessments, program policy, staff training, […]

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Are you curious about how your local court decides which print materials to translate? What to do in the event the court-assigned interpreter has a conflict of interest with a survivor’s case? How to organize and advocate for more (and better) language access languages in courts for survivors? If so – you have clearly identified […]

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Para español, entre aquí In many cases, police officers ask victim’s children to interpret. While this happens often and can be a convenient way to interpret, the procedure raises some concerns. Below are three reasons that having children interpret for their parents should be avoided at all cost. First, when minors are utilized for interpretation […]

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