fbpx Home - National Latino Network
Español |English
Escape

Safety Alert: If you believe your computer activities are being monitored, please access this site from a safer computer. To immediately exit this site, click the escape button. If you are in immediate danger, contact 911, a local crisis line, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224.

Skip Navigation

Safety Alert: If you believe your computer activities are being monitored, please access this site from a safer computer. To immediately exit this site, click the escape button. If you are in immediate danger, contact 911, a local crisis line, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224.


Category Archives: Research

The following information is a thoughtful proposal of solutions to the humanitarian crisis at the border, as outlined in the report by Casa de Esperanza’s National Latin@ Network and St. Edward’s University, titled Latina Immigrant Women and Children’s Well-Being and Access to Services After Detention. Findings emerging from these data point to several policy implementation […]

Read More

*Trigger warning. Please note this entry contains language and material that might be triggering for some readers. The following information is from a research report by Casa de Esperanza’s National Latin@ Network and St. Edward’s University. Download the entire report for free here. Post-Detention: Surviving the Holding Pattern This study reveals a host of immediate […]

Read More

The following information is from a research report by Casa de Esperanza’s National Latin@ Network and St. Edward’s University. Download the entire report for free here. Replicating Violence and Trauma An overwhelming number of women in immigrant detention are survivors of violence, abuse and trauma, having experienced violence directly or having been exposed to tremendous […]

Read More

The following information is from a research report by Casa de Esperanza’s National Latin@ Network and St. Edward’s University. Download the entire report for free here. Detention: Encerrada como un animal* Despite the manner in which women crossed the border into the U.S., whether presenting themselves at a port of entry as an asylum-seeker or […]

Read More

In 2015, the Latin@ population in the United States reached 57 million, with almost half (47%) living in suburban and rural areas. Latin@s are not a monolithic group. Approximately 65% of Latin@s are born in the U.S., whereas 35% are foreign-born, having immigrated to the United States. This community encompasses a wide variety of experiences […]

Read More

The information in this blog is part of our National Latin@ Research Center on Family and Social Change’s report, Latina Immigrant Women and Children’s Well-Being and Access to Services After Detention. Please see the original report for for information and proper citation. Since 2011, the United States has seen a dramatic increase in the arrival […]

Read More

The following information is part of the Case Studies Findings that were published in A Scan of the Field: Learning About Serving Survivors of Human Trafficking, a report published by Casa de Esperanza: National Latin@ Network’s research team. Part of that report is being published here in recognition that January is Human Trafficking Awareness Month.  Case […]

Read More

By: María Cristina Pacheco Alcalá, Project Manager, Casa de Esperanza: National Latin@ Network Human trafficking is a crime that occurs when a person uses force, fraud or coercion to control someone else for the purpose of making them engage in commercial sex acts or soliciting labor or other services against their will[1]. In 2000, the […]

Read More

Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) happens within the context of a family’s daily life, which is deeply affected by numerous factors, both personal and systemic, that impact and are impacted by IPV. Some of these have been documented in the literature. Cultural values must be identified and understood to develop effective IPV interventions. Two values of […]

Read More

Developing culturally relevant human services for racial and ethnic minorities has become a national priority. However, understanding what works, how it works, and why it works within certain cultural-specific communities continues to be severely limited, despite efforts of professional fields to promote multicultural practice. This limitation is only intensified when looking at the subpopulation of […]

Read More