Español |English
Escape

Safety Alert: If you believe your computer activities are being monitored, please access this site from a safer computer. To immediately exit this site, click the escape button. If you are in immediate danger, contact 911, a local crisis line, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224.

Skip Navigation

Safety Alert: If you believe your computer activities are being monitored, please access this site from a safer computer. To immediately exit this site, click the escape button. If you are in immediate danger, contact 911, a local crisis line, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224.


Facing the Fear of Deportation, Part 3: Sharing the Research

Thursday, October 11th, 2018
Infographic with information about the mental health effects of deportation

Click the image to download the infographic

The University of Southern California Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work published a research article examining the mental health effects that the threat of deportation poses to those who experience it. Casa de Esperanza’s National Latin@ Network has published it in three parts. Click here to read Part 1, click here to read part 2, or click here to read the article in its entirety on USC’s website. This blog (Part 3 of this series) contains information from that research that was put into an infographic that is shareable on social media. Click the image to download the infographic.

Family separation due to deportation can be traumatizing for the millions of children living in families with an undocumented parent.

Between 2009 and 2013: 5.3 million children in the U.S. had an undocumented parent. 85 percent of those children, of 4.24 million were U.S. born.

Living with Fear

For children of undocumented immigrants:

  • The threat of deportation causes fear and anxiety.
  • If a parent is deported, their children’s anxiety worsens.
  • Prolonged anxiety creates toxic stress that hinders learning and reasoning.

Short-Term Effects

  • Withdrawal
  • Feelings of isolation
  • Disrupted eating and sleeping patterns
  • Anger
  • Depression

Long-Term Effects

  • PTSD
  • Poor identity formation
  • Difficulty forming relationships
  • Distrust of authority figures
  • Behavioral and academic difficulties

Barriers to Accessing Mental Health Services  

Families with undocumented immigrants encounter barriers to accessing mental health services which can exacerbate mental health problems.

  • Culture — Mental health services may not be culturally or linguistically appropriate.
  • Discrimination — Families with undocumented immigrants are targets of racism and racial profiling.
  • Fear — Families fear accessing services will expose a family member’s undocumented status.
  • Poverty — Struggling families have difficulty affording resources to keep children physically and mentally healthy.

———————————————————————————————–

Created by: USC Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work

Sources

© 2018 The University of Southern California for its USC Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work. All rights reserved.

Comment Feed

No Responses (yet)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available