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Safety Alert: If you believe your computer activities are being monitored, please access this site from a safer computer. To immediately exit this site, click the escape button. If you are in immediate danger, contact 911, a local crisis line, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224.

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Safety Alert: If you believe your computer activities are being monitored, please access this site from a safer computer. To immediately exit this site, click the escape button. If you are in immediate danger, contact 911, a local crisis line, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224.


Limited English Proficiency (LEP) refers to individuals who do not speak English as their primary language and have a limited ability to read, speak, write, or understand English. To determine which individuals may have limited English proficiency, consider the following: English is not their primary language; They have a limited ability to read, speak, write, […]

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Casa de Esperanza: National Latin@ Network is proud to announce its publication of the Te Invito Facilitator’s Guide. This facilitator’s guide was created to serve as a helpful manual for advocates, community leaders, service providers, counselors, parents, and those who work with men involved with domestic violence to help steer the men they work with […]

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Ensuring Access: Non-discrimination provisions requires providing access to all survivors, regardless of immigration status Ensuring Access to Services Necessary for the Protection of Life or Safety Some advocates or service providers express uncertainty as to whether their program can serve undocumented immigrants. When Congress enacted the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) in […]

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Victoria “La Mala” Ortiz, a Latina recording artist whose Regional Mexican songs have topped musical charts in several Spanish-speaking countries, put her best foot forward on the fifth season of Univision’s dance competition, Mira Quién Baila. She selected Casa de Esperanza as her charity of choice to receive a donation as a result of her […]

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This week, Uber announced that Casa de Esperanza is among the seven national organizations to receive a portion of the $5 million funding it is dedicating to sexual assault and domestic violence awareness through its “Driving Change” campaign. Casa de Esperanza will receive funding from Uber, along with national partners Raliance, NNEDV, Women of Color Network, Inc., A CALL TO […]

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Written by Pierre Berastaín, Assistant Director of Innovation and Engagement, Casa de Esperanza: National Latin@ Network How to become civically engaged Whether you are a Republican, Democrat, Libertarian, or from any other political party or ideology, you probably feel strongly about some issues Congress and the Trump administration are considering. From advocacy around the DREAM […]

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Written by: Rosie Hidalgo, Senior Director of Public Policy, Casa de Esperanza: National Latin@ Network Immigrant victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, and trafficking often face additional challenges and barriers when seeking assistance and safety. It is well known that perpetrators of these crimes often exploit a victim’s immigration status as a tool of abuse […]

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By: Paula Gomez Stordy, M.Ed., Consultant/Educator Political conversations were the backdrop of my childhood and the source of passionate arguments in my family. In 1973, four years after my parents emigrated from Chile to Boston, the U.S. supported a coup that resulted in the death of socialist president Salvador Allende and positioned Augusto Pinochet as […]

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Written by: Heidi Notario, M.A., Director of Implementation and Social Change; and Micaela Ríos Anguiano, Project Manager; Casa de Esperanza: National Latin@ Network. Audre Lorde thought of self-care as an act of political warfare. For many of us, the notion of taking care of ourselves often proves difficult or intangible, at best. Today, in particular, […]

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1. Understand collective and historical trauma. Understand the origins of historical, collective, structural, and intergenerational trauma, and recognize Latin@ survivors’ resiliency, wisdom, and strength. To learn more about the different kinds of traumas, read Trauma-informed Principles Through a Culturally Specific Lens. 2. Avoid making assumptions and be prepared to challenge your own beliefs about Latin@ […]

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