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Safety Alert: If you believe your computer activities are being monitored, please access this site from a safer computer. To immediately exit this site, click the escape button. If you are in immediate danger, contact 911, a local crisis line, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224.


Tag Archives: domestic violence

Many women, regardless of race or ethnicity, choose to continue to live with partners who have been (or continue to be) abusive. Traditional domestic violence intervention approaches have emphasized women leaving abusive relationships, but the applicability and acceptability of this approach for women from culturally diverse backgrounds, including immigrant and Latina survivors of intimate partner […]

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By: Jorge Vidal, Project Coordinator, Casa de Esperanza: National Latin@ Network Casa de Esperanza recognizes the significant contributions of culturally specific community-based organizations to the anti-violence field. As the Comprehensive Technical Assistance Provider for the Culturally Specific Services Program (CSSP) grant issued by the Office of Violence Against Women (OVW), one of our primary goals […]

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We at Casa de Esperanza know from our work with community-based organizations that you are already experts in pulling information you need to do your work on a daily basis. Sometimes what might be missing is the documentation of such efforts. In response to organizations large and small across the country interested in learning how […]

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When Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) was first implemented, we asked a number of shelters and organizations that work with survivors of domestic and sexual violence to answer a survey which included a question that asked them if they had ever helped a survivor of sexual or domestic violence obtain DACA. We heard stories […]

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The 2017 survey reveals the impact increased immigration enforcement has had on victims experiencing domestic violence and sexual assault. Seven national organizations that work to end domestic violence and sexual assault released the results of the 2017 Advocate and Legal Service Survey Regarding Immigrant Survivors on May 18, 2017. The Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based […]

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Name: Marissa Kurtz Title: Program and Administrative Assistant Main Responsibilities: To work with the NLN team to provide support with communications work, national events, grant reporting and technology platforms. Where are you from? I was born in Guatemala and raised in Arlington, VA. Where do you feel most at home? This is not always a […]

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In response to the growing need for advocates to have access to accurate information about immigration for immigrant survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault, Casa de Esperanza’s National Latin@ Network has compiled a library of resources and materials aimed at directing organizers, activists, attorneys, community leaders, immigrant victims and survivors and their families to […]

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Written by: María Cristina Pacheco-Alcalá, Project Coordinator, Casa de Esperanza: National Latin@ Network What is human trafficking? Why do people keep talking about it? What does it have to do with me? The National Human Trafficking Resource Center defines human trafficking as a form of modern-day slavery. This crime occurs when a trafficker uses force, […]

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Tips for Survivor Speakers As a survivor, are you considering if, how, and when to share your story with the public? Do you wonder what it would be like to step into the role of a public speaker? This guide includes frequently asked questions and tangible steps that can help you make some of these […]

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At the age of sixteen, Consuelo went to a party with some friends after work. At the party, one of her co-workers raped her.  Had she been a witness to her own rape, she would have immediately named it rape, but because it happened to her and not someone else, she feared she had done […]

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