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Safety Alert: If you believe your computer activities are being monitored, please access this site from a safer computer. To immediately exit this site, click the escape button. If you are in immediate danger, contact 911, a local crisis line, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224.


Tips to Deepen the Conversation in Talking with your Children about Confrontation: Decimos No Mas

Wednesday, May 9th, 2018

Young boy looking over net or fenceAddressing Confrontation

​Violent relationships in adolescence can have serious ramifications by putting victims at higher risk for substance abuse, eating disorders, risky sexual behaviors, and further domestic violence. Teaching your children to control themselves when faced with confrontation will equip them with tools to build healthy relationships.

Teach assertiveness, not aggressiveness

Teach your children to make their feelings known by stating their opinions, desires, and reactions clearly. Give them language to help them negotiate difficult situations. For example, “I’m not comfortable; can we talk about this?”

Teach anger control

Help your children recognize their personal signs for anger. Do they have tensed arms and shoulders? Do they feel their hearts pounding? Are they clenching their fists? These are signs and feelings that need to be acknowledged and resolved. Give them tools to help them recognize and name their feelings. Additionally, give them tools to calm down, such as deep breathing, counting backward from 10, reminding themselves that they have control over what to say and do next, or if nothing else, walking away. Teach your children that any incident of violence in a relationship is a serious problem.

Teach problem-solving

Help your children work through problem-solving skills.

  • Examine what happened and what might have caused the problem
  • Think of different ways it could be resolved
  • Consider the consequences to each alternative
  • Discuss their choices

When they are small, talk aloud about your own problem-solving so they can observe what you do. For example, as you pack lunch for work, you might say, “Two tamales and some coffee is enough at lunchtime. But I get hungry again in the afternoon. I could pack more lunch but I think that would just make me too full. I think I will pack a banana for a quick little snack for later, instead.” Beginning when they are small, permit them to make age-appropriate decisions (“Which toy do you want to sleep with?” “Do you want to play with your blocks or read a book?”) This allows your children to begin practicing problem-solving skills. As they mature, they can make progressively more complex decisions (“You may choose what to do with the five dollars your aunt gave you for your birthday,” etc.); just make sure to be clear about any limits (“No firecrackers”) and help them think through the steps.

As your children get older, help them work through the steps above to resolve disagreements between siblings or friends. You and your children can also discuss problems that characters in stories and videos experience as well as possible outcomes if the characters had made different choices.

Teach negotiation

Teach your children to acknowledge difficult situations and give them the skills to state their point of view honestly to help create options that benefit all parties. Learning to brainstorm options (thinking of different ways to solve the problem) is an important skill. Make sure to provide your child with the opportunity and time to practice. Once they learn, many children will invent and create options on their own, but often need reminders and help to see the process through (even adults often forget to seek options that keep both people happy or to remember shared interests, such as “I love you,” to motivate the negotiation).

For more information on healthy communication, healthy relationships, and healthy sexuality, visit WeSayNoMas.org. Under Deepen the Conversation, parents will find tips and ideas on how to talk to their children about many important topics.

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2 Responses

  1. what can i do to receive the guide?

    1. Karen Alonzi says:

      Download the conversation starter pack at https://www.decimosnomas.org/en/tools/tools-for-parents/.

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